There are approximately 40,000 certified Passive Houses (PHs) worldwide. That may seem like a large number but in actuality 40,000 represents only 0.002 percent of the homes in the world today.

In a recent issue of Home Energy magazine, Mike Smith, our senior marketing manager, residential products, shared why this is the case.

  • They’re relatively new.
  • They must meet stringent criteria.
  • They can be costly to build – five to 20 percent more than a standard home.
  • The elements of PH design can be difficult for homeowners to understand – like why their insulation must be one foot thick.

The good news is building PHs is growing and the Pacific Northwest is leading the way. In fact, more than a third of the nation’s certified PHs are located in the upper left of the U.S.

  • Salem, Oregon is home to the Rue-Evans residence, the region’s first certified PH.
  • Park Passive in Seattle is a PH that The Seattle Times said “[the owners] heated last winter using the clothes dryer.”
  • The Full Plane PH in Portland, Oregon met PH standards and even the rigorous Living Building Challenge™ by achieving net zero energy, waste and water.

“As time passes, we will see more and more projects like the Full Plane PH and its Pacific Northwest neighbors,” Mike says. “Not every house will be passive within our lifetime but it’s an exciting time for building and home energy professionals.”

To read the article in its entirety, click here.